SMARTGREENS 2019 Abstracts


Area 1 - Demos and Use-Cases

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 16
Title:

Technical Validation of the RLS Smart Grid Approach to Increase Power Grid Capacity without Physical Grid Expansion

Authors:

Ramón Christen, Vincent Layec, Gwendolin Wilke and Holger Wache

Abstract: The electrification of the global energy system and the shift towards distributed power production from sustainable sources triggers an increased network capacity demand at times of high production or consumption. Existing energy management solutions can help mitigate resulting high costs of large-scale physical grid reinforcement, but often interfere in customer processes or restrict free access to the energy market. In a preceding paper, we proposed the RLS regional load shaping approach as a novel business model and load management solution in middle voltage grid to resolve this dilemma: market-based incentives for all stakeholders are provided to allow for flexible loads that are non-critical in customer processes to be allocated to the unused grid capacity traditionally reserved for N-1 security of supply. We provide a validation of the technical aspects of the approach, with an evaluation of the day-ahead load forecasting method for industry customers and a load optimization heuristics. The latter is tested by a simulation run on a scenario of network branch with provoked capacity bottlenecks. The method handles all provoked critical network capacity situations as expected.

Area 2 - Smart and Digital Services

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 35
Title:

GREISSLER.PLUS: Towards a Modern Distribution of Regional Goods in Rural Areas in the Digital Era

Authors:

Lukas Rohatsch, Harald Wahl and Josef Wagner

Abstract: The supply with daily consumer goods is a basic need for all people. Especially in rural areas, the supply with groceries and goods of daily use has become increasingly difficult. The project GREISSLER.PLUS tried to overcome this difficulty by designing individual operating models and providing an ICT platform. Therefore, we carried out specific surveys as well as workshops to analyze the needs of the target groups in the pilot region Schneebergland in Austria. After defining the requirements and developing five possible operating models, we executed a pilot phase for testing purposes as well as for enhancing the functionalities. At final stage of the project, we transferred the ICT platform as well as a specific business plan to a new owner who will ensure an economically sustainable operation.

Paper Nr: 42
Title:

Energy Efficiency: Do You Know Your Prospective User?

Authors:

Julia Kantorovitch and Janne Laine

Abstract: Smart homes are seen as an enabling technology and integrated part of future energy efficient system. However, actual level of uptake of Smart home energy solutions is still low. New energy solutions must be shown to be attractive and valuable before they will be accepted. To this end, the values and expectations of prospective user must be understood better. Inspired by Design Science research, this paper presents a novel method, found in synergy of scenario-based research, content analysing methods and user experience mapping, which helps to assess if the vision for Smart home energy technology is widely coherent between prospective users and industry.

Area 3 - Smart Cities and Smart Buildings

Full Papers
Paper Nr: 5
Title:

Intelligent Control and Protection of Power Systems in the Russian Cities

Authors:

Nikolai Voropai, Victor Kurbatsky, Nikita Tomin, Dmitry Efimov and Irina Kolosok

Abstract: A distinctive feature of the energy system development in Russian megalopolises is the need for a comprehensive approach to the problem of making the network intelligent. The paper presents the following contributions: (1) intelligent operation and smart emergency protection in Russia including requirements for new protection systems; (2) a description of smart grid territorial clusters in the interconnected power systems of Russia. (3) state estimation (SE) techniques as informational support of the intelligent power grid control including SE with phasor measurements use, dynamic SE, and cyber-physical security issues of SE; (4) a hybrid Volt/VAr control approach based on AI techniques such as machine learning and multi-agent systems based models.

Paper Nr: 6
Title:

“I Want to ... Change”: Micro-moment based Recommendations can Change Users’ Energy Habits

Authors:

Christos Sardianos, Iraklis Varlamis, George Dimitrakopoulos, Dimosthenis Anagnostopoulos, Abdullah Alsalemi, Faycal Bensaali and Abbes Amira

Abstract: Since electricity consumption of households in developing countries is dramatically increasing every year, it is now more prudent than ever to utilize technology-based solutions that assist energy end-users to improve energy efficiency without affecting quality of life. User behavior is the most important factor that influences household energy consumption and recommender systems can be the technology enabler for shaping the users’ behavior towards energy efficiency. The current literature mostly focuses on energy usage monitoring and home automation and fails to engage and motivate users, who are not as committed and self-motivated. In this work, we present a context-aware recommender system that analyses user activities and understands their habits. Based on the output of this analysis, the system synchronizes with the user activities and presents personalized energy efficiency recommendations at the right moment and place. The recommendation algorithm considers user preferences, energy goals, and availability in order to maximize the acceptance of a recommended action and increase the efficiency of the recommender system. The results from the evaluation on a publicly available dataset comprising energy consumption data from multiple devices shows that micro-moments repeatedly occur within user’s timeline (covering more than 35% of user future activities) and can be learned from user logs.

Paper Nr: 12
Title:

Technology Adoption in Smart City Initiatives: Starting Points and Influence Factors

Authors:

Christian Bremser, Gunther Piller and Markus Helfert

Abstract: The concept of smart city is considered as a new paradigm of urban development. Information and communication technologies are expected to transform cities into smart cities and improve the citizens’ quality of life. However, smart city initiatives still have difficulties to leverage value from technology opportunities. How smart city initiatives start to examine the possibilities of new technologies for smart services is therefore a highly interesting question. Based on a multiple case study we describe two different approaches and identify factors that were crucial for the course of action. As a result, we found on the one hand smart city initiatives that consider the involvement of citizens as essential and start technology adoption from a need perspective. On the other hand, we found initiatives that see new technology and standardized data exchange as a unique opportunity and therefore start with a systematic build-up of technology and data platforms. Innovation adoption research is used as a theoretical basis.

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 15
Title:

Indicators for Self-assessment of Human Practices in Homes

Authors:

Manar Amayri, Helene Haller, Stephane Ploix, Frederic Wurtz and Gilles Debizet

Abstract: Usage indicators are proposed in smart buildings in order to analyze occupant behavior towards energy usage. Indicators are a means of communication to interact with occupants of a living area so they can make informed decisions regarding their everyday customs and uses. Through them, occupants will be able to compare and challenge themselves with others or with their past results. Moreover, occupants will be able to understand the consequences and effects of their energy behavior and learn how to improve it without degrading their comfort. Heat flow through door/window indicators (heat losses), and dishwasher indicator have been calculated and discussed in an apartment context. There were 70 heterogeneous sensors previously installed to gather the information needed. These indicators have been evaluated by considering three conditions: measurable/calculable, understandable and comparable/challengeable between different houses or users. Studying and measuring different indicators give a sort of energy performance of a building, which in turn helps to improve automated building management tools.

Paper Nr: 30
Title:

Potential of Supermarket Refrigeration Systems for Grid Balancing by Demand Response

Authors:

Tommie Månsson and York Ostermeyer

Abstract: The environmental goals of European Union demand a larger share of renewable energy sources for electrical energy generation. With the increasing share of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind, the utility grids has an increasing need for energy storage and/or demand side management. With a high energy intensity and a large thermal inertia, the refrigeration systems of supermarkets appear as an attractive actor for demand response in such scenario. Theoretically they have the capability to absorb vast amounts of electrical energy as stored compressor work, lowering the temperature of the food goods in the refrigerators. Alternatively supermarkets have the capability of reducing their energy demand by allowing the food goods temperature increase to its upper limit, reducing electrical power demand for the grid. This positioning paper will further discuss the attractiveness as and feasibility to use supermarkets for electrical energy balancing by demand response in a smart grid.

Paper Nr: 13
Title:

How to Realize a Compact City: Street Activeness and Agent-based Urban Modeling

Authors:

Hideyuki Nagai and Setsuya Kurahashi

Abstract: The purpose of this research is to verify the effectiveness of the combination of the introduction of tramway with introducing a public facility for urban residents and promoting street activeness around it, on urban sprawl. An agent-based model (ABM) for simulating the changes of urban structure through autonomous behavior of urban residents was designed, and the simulation experiments were conducted based on the assumption of combining these policies. As a result, this research clarified the following points and how they were. First, the synergistic effects of the introduction of tramway, the proper location of a public facility for urban residents, and the promotion of street activeness around it, are effective in maintaining a poly-centric compact urban structure. Second, the introduction of tramway targeting the urban sprawl can exert a profound effect only when combined with the above-mentioned policies, although it takes a long period. Third, a mono-centric compact urban structure is realized along with the above, while improving the living environment and revitalizing the urban central area.

Paper Nr: 23
Title:

The Rationale of SPV in Indian Smart City Development

Authors:

Kranti K. Maurya and Arindam Biswas

Abstract: Indian cities are largely managed by the Local Governments, empowered by the Indian Constitutional (74th Amendment) act, 1992. In 2015, the Union Government of India introduced Smart Cities Mission (SCM), in which 100 cities were selected to be developed as Smart City (Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs, 2015a). The Union Government introduced a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) as the implementing agency of SCM (Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs, 2015b). Each one of these 100 cities needed to establish a SPV, which coordinate this mission. The decision to establish SPVs opens up many pertinent questions regarding its legitimacy of being an urban institution. SPVs have not been used in overall city administration yet, so in this area performance of SPVs, are yet to be known. The paper investigates the establishment of SPVs, its authenticity and its contribution to city development. It checks the legal support of its constitution. The paper argues about the achievements of the SPVs over the traditional governance process with the help of governance analysis methods (Urban Governance Index). To streamline the paper, authors have selected (to investigate) two Indian cities Pune and Varanasi wherever needed. The paper also discusses the historical context of SPVs, functioning module of SPVs for project planning and implementation. Further, the findings of the paper suggest that because SPVs are being used for a small pilot area of the cities, enlarging the SPV mechanism to the level of Local Government may translate into the similar type of governance system.

Paper Nr: 43
Title:

A Strategic Approach to Smart Cities through CA and Shape Grammars

Authors:

Fakiri Ioanna and Tsoumpri Dimitra

Abstract: In recent years we have seen a gradually increasing concern for the urban landscape and the way it is designed and evaluated. This concern, a result of the emergence of digital technologies and convergence of different scientific disciplines, is based on the ability of design tools to support and reinforce the discussion on urban landscape as an open process for action. But, how do we design a new urban space employing these design tools? So far the discussion on the design and form of the city placed emphasis on the creation of a communication platform that functions either through the development of interpersonal and interactive relationships of the users, or as an entity for configuring and displaying visual messages and communication to society. The term "smart city", has been linked with digital applications, sensors, and software to produce the city of the future. However, the real challenge is to develop a "smart city," that starts from the city of today and enables the combination of these smart practices by activating infrastructure that may reform the spatial structure of the urban morphology. This paper will introduce a "reformer," the natural landscape, based on which a new methodological approach shall be established, in order to manage the urban landscape. The paper presumes that the execution of the cell automata demonstrates, loose coupled with Shape Grammar, provides a robust and useful application of this reformer in metropolitan planning. The connected techniques shift locally as a component of the points of interest concerning specific examples and procedures to be advanced. This will help create a "smarter city," which may find applications in various fields that start from today’s city, instead of trying to compose an ideal image of the city of tomorrow, that can bridge the gap between digital, natural and urban environment. The main theme of this paper is part of the extended scope of Landscape Urbanism, according to which the urban landscape can be redefined / designed through the remedial procedures of the urban landscape.

Area 4 - Sustainable Computing and Systems

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 14
Title:

FREDOSAR: Towards a Security-aware Open System Architecture Framework Supporting Model based Systems Engineering

Authors:

Michael Fischinger, Christian Neureiter, Christoph Binder, Norbert Egger and Michael Renoth

Abstract: The Smart Grid is the leading example when talking about complex and critical systems. Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) represents an appropriate approach for the mastery of this complexity. However, achieving full traceability between the model of a system and the concrete implementation is still an open issue. For this, Model Driven Development (MDD) is proposed. Hence, the development of a general middleware framework, which comprises a well-defined, customized architecture and provides accurately elaborated interfaces, would probably facilitate the Model Based Approach in a decisive manner. Thus, the present work addresses the development of a versatile architecture framework, the FRee EDucational Open System ARchitecture (FREDOSAR), which also includes an open source implementation. Due to the criticality of systems like the Smart Grid, Security by Design is another central aspect of this architecture development process. For evaluation, the applicability of the framework is finally verified by the implementation of several case studies based on FREDOSAR, focusing on the quality attributes mentioned.

Paper Nr: 17
Title:

Efficient Routing for Overlay Networks in a Smart Grid Context

Authors:

Lasse Orda, Tue V. Jensen, Oliver Gehrke and Henrik W. Bindner

Abstract: In the modern smart grid, prosumers and communities, organized in energy collectives, are showing an increased desire to trade energy directly using different forms of decentralized market models. To support local autonomy and distributed services, decentralized networking, using peer-to-peer (P2P) networks, can be used to facilitate dynamic discovery and establish communication between peers. When using a modern overlay network based on a Distributed Hash Table (DHT), the performance of the overlay network can be improved by using the physical properties found in the smart grid context. This paper presents an improved network routing model that takes advantage of these properties, to add a location-aware heuristic to the search algorithms of a standard overlay network. Concepts from complex networks are utilized to improve the average search path and provide a more efficient design over previous solutions. A proof of concept shows that the design results in a more efficient routing model, when used in a smart grid context, compared to a standard uniformly distributed network model.

Area 5 - Energy-Aware Systems and Technologies

Full Papers
Paper Nr: 8
Title:

Energy Consumption Characterization based on a Self-analysis Tool: A Case Study in Yarn Manufacturing

Authors:

Samuele Branchetti, Carlo Petrovich, Gessica Ciaccio, Piero De Sabbata, Angelo Frascella and Giuseppe Nigliaccio

Abstract: Even if energy efficiency represents a crucial issue for the sustainability of the manufacturing industry, the companies need to be encouraged in investing their resources for this goal. One of the means to facilitate this effort is the comparison of the energy performances with similar factories. Nevertheless, since the enterprises are very heterogeneous, these performance values have, even within a specified manufacturing sector, a high variability and therefore risk not to be representative. The dispersion of these data has to be decisively decreased. This goal is pursued here by means of an energy consumption characterization model based on: 1. a self-analysis software tool collecting energy consumption data in a simple and homogeneous way; 2. the clustering of the factories; 3. the separation of the auxiliary energy uses from the production process energy consumption. The method is here applied to textile industry with a focus on the electrical consumption in yarn factories. The outcomes show a correlation with some production variables, such as the raw materials, and allow to reduce the relative errors of the energy performances of different factories from about 80% to about 25-40%. In this way, energy reference indicators can be built in an acceptable and representative way.

Paper Nr: 9
Title:

Day-Ahead Optimization Algorithm for Demand Side Management in Microgrids

Authors:

Tiba Feizi, Lennart von der Heiden, Raisa Popova, Mauricio Rojas and Jean-Marie Gerbaulet

Abstract: Germany has the political vision of reducing carbon emissions and becoming environmentally sound. According to this vision, the number of electric vehicles (EVs), charging stations and renewable power generators being installed in low voltage grids would increase. The uncontrolled charging of a large number of EVs can generate additional load peaks and lead to the violation of utilization limits in distribution grids. However, the charging of EVs can be controlled, providing the opportunity to relieve the grid and reduce the peak load. This control strategy is called Demand Side Management (DSM). This paper presents a day-ahead optimization algorithm for DSM in a microgrid. The developed algorithm focuses on minimizing the load peaks of a microgrid. Two scenarios, with and without stationary battery storage, have been developed and tested with various historical load profiles of the Micro Smart Grid (MSG) on the European Energy Forum (EUREF) campus in Berlin. The optimization results have shown that using the algorithm offers the possibility to reduce microgrid load peaks.

Paper Nr: 10
Title:

Identifying the “Do’s” and “Don’ts” for a Trust-Building CCU Product Label

Authors:

Anika Linzenich, Katrin Arning and Martina Ziefle

Abstract: Carbon Capture and Utilization (CCU) is a technological approach to reduce CO2 emissions and fossil resource depletion by using CO2, e.g., from power plants, as feedstock for the manufacturing of products. Since CCU products are novel and have a low public awareness, a specific product label might be helpful to inform the public about and build trust in CCU products. However, product labels should not only target at the merchantability of novel products but should integrate users’ information needs and their requirements towards trust and reliability of the product and the production process. In an online survey with 147 German laypeople, requirements for a trusted CCU label were investigated to derive recommendations for a successful, trust-building label and certification process design. Results revealed a positive trust in the CCU label. CCU label trust tended to be higher in persons with higher trust in other people and product labels in general. Purchase intentions for labeled CCU products were increased by a higher CCU label trust and environmentally aware behaviors and decreased by a higher technical self-efficacy. Trusted sources informing about the label were identified as focal point for increasing label trust at this early stage of market entering for CCU products.

Paper Nr: 25
Title:

Sizing of II-Life Batteries for Grid Support Applications and Economic Evaluations

Authors:

Giuseppe Graber, Vito Calderaro, Vincenzo Galdi and Antonio Piccolo

Abstract: Power systems are facing increasing stress due to modernization changes in both supply, through the growing penetration level of renewable sources, and demand due to the spread diffusion of electric vehicles (EVs). In this scenario, the use of energy storage systems (ESSs) is becoming technologically attractive but problems of economic and ecological sustainability are still evident. For these reasons, II-Life battery modules are a possible solution for supporting power systems: they are a promising prospect for the modernization process. We propose a method to size an ESS of exhausted plug-in EV battery packs for grid support applications. The method estimates the residual value of cycles for II-Life battery modules, the decrease in the supplied power due to the battery ageing and the number of EV battery packs to meet service requirements. Then, an economic assessment is presented to compare them with an equivalent I-Life storage system.

Short Papers
Paper Nr: 11
Title:

Does Size Matter? Investigating Laypeoples’ Preferences for Roll-out Scenarios of Alternative Fuel Production Plants

Authors:

Katrin Arning, Barbara S. Zaunbrecher, Maximilian Borning, Niklas van Bracht, Martina Ziefle and Albert Moser

Abstract: The substitution of fossil fuels by alternative fuels (AF) is a promising approach to achieve climate protection goals. Since the production of AF places considerable demands on the existing power system, planning processes also have to consider the energy demand and supply of AF production plants. Apart from these technical requirements, the acceptability of new AF production plants and their power supply infrastructure also needs to be considered. An empirical study (n = 313, carried out 2018 in Germany) based on the conjoint measurement approach was conducted, which investigated the impact of acceptance-relevant criteria on preferences for infrastructure scenarios for AF production plants. Emissions of an AF production plant had the highest impact on preferences, followed by the electricity mix, where surplus and renewables were preferred as energy sources. Compensatory measures, especially price reductions for AF, and the application field of AF were of minor relevance for preference decisions. The size of AF production plants was also not relevant for scenario preferences, at least on an abstract meta-level of planning scenarios. Based on the results, the integration of acceptance as soft factor into power system planning processes is discussed and recommendations for future planning processes and -deployment activities for acceptable AF production infrastructure are derived.

Paper Nr: 19
Title:

A Novel Demand Side Management (DSM) Technique for Electric Grids with High Renewable Energy Mix using Hierarchical Clustering of Loads

Authors:

Muhammad A. Arshad, Syed Hasnain and Naveed Arshad

Abstract: Shortfall can occur at irregular times in an electric grid that has high a concentration of intermittent renewable energy sources. Many methods are being studied, proposed and used to change the demand in order to match the supply with the most common being Load Curtailment. New DSM techniques have evolved as a result of advancements in AMI technologies. The goal is to minimize the difference between supply and demand at the time of shortfall. Our proposed algorithm selects consumers and limits their energy consumption by profiling the commercial sites based on their historical consumption behaviour. Then, to save the required amount of energy, the sites with peak consumption levels with respect to their own daily usage are targeted. Thus, it harnesses the maximum potential of electricity deduction from a site while minimizing its effects on the residents.

Paper Nr: 34
Title:

Anomaly Detection in Smart Grids based on Software Defined Networks

Authors:

Oliver Jung, Paul Smith, Julian Magin and Lenhard Reuter

Abstract: Software-defined networking (SDN) is a networking architecture that increasingly receives attention from power grid operators. The basic principle is the separation of the packet forwarding data plane and the central controller implemented in software that provides a programmable network control plane. SDN can provide various functions that facilitate the operation of smart grid communication networks, as it can support network management, quality of service (QoS) enforcement, network security, and network slicing. Due to periodical updates of the central controller, a real-time view of the network is available that allows for detecting attacks like e.g. denial-of-service (DoS) attack or network scanning. These kinds of attacks can be detected by applying anomaly detection mechanisms on the gathered information. In this position paper, we highlight the benefits SDN can bring to smart grids, address the implications of SDN on network security, and finally describe how information collected by a popular OpenFlow SDN controller can be used to detect attacks in smart grid communication networks.

Paper Nr: 36
Title:

ROSEO: Novel Savonious-type BIWT Design based on the Concentration of Horizontal and Vertical Circulation of Wind on the Edge of Buildings

Authors:

Oscar Garcia, Mario D. Rio, Alain Ulazia, Juan L. Osa and Gabriel Ibarra-Berastegi

Abstract: In this paper a new Building Integrated Wind Turbine (BIWT) called ROSEO-BIWT is presented. The ROSEO-BIWT is installed on the edge of the buildings and it consists of a Savonius wind turbine and two concentration panels that have the purpose of accelerating the usual horizontal wind together with the vertical upward air stream on the wall of the building, improving the performance of the wind turbine and also getting a good architectural integration. We have studied its hypothetical performance and design configuration in a tall building of Bilbao using wind data from the reanalysis ERA-Interim (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts’ reanalysis), from an anemometer to calibrate the data, and its real small-scale behavior in a wind tunnel. Promising preliminary results have been obtained, which could suppose an energy production increment of 20%.

Paper Nr: 37
Title:

Impact of Social Welfare Methods on Multi-objective Resource Allocation in Energy Systems

Authors:

Aisha Umair, Anders Clausen, Yves Demazeau and Bo N. Jørgensen

Abstract: Multi-agent resource allocation refers to the distribution of resources among agents. Resource allocation can be particularly challenging if the agents have conflicting objectives over multiple interdependent issues. In such cases, multi-objective optimization methods can be used to find an optimal allocation of resources, that maximizes social welfare. Social welfare refers to the welfare of the entire society of agents and therefore considered as a suitable metric for assessing the overall system performance in multi-agent resource allocation. In this paper we study and discuss different notions of social welfare and investigate their impact on the optimization outcome specifically for the problems comprising multiple conflicting objectives with interdependent issues. To this end, we implement and apply different notions of social welfare to a real-world, complex problem, where a resource domain is responsible for making allocation of energy resources to multiple energy intensive consumers (Commercial Greenhouse Growers). The problem is modeled as a multi-objective optimization context. Our results show how different social welfare methods affect the optimization outcome and result in different socially optimal resource allocations, depending on the behavior we expect from the system.

Paper Nr: 39
Title:

On the Use of Average versus Marginal Emission Factors

Authors:

Wouter Schram, Ioannis Lampropoulos, Tarek AlSkaif and Wilfried van Sark

Abstract: In this paper, we propose using marginal emission factors instead of average emission factors for determining the impact of adding variable renewable electricity to the generation mix. Average emission factors assume constant emissions over time, which does not reflect reality. Therefore, they cannot be used for e.g. accurately determining the mitigated CO2 emissions by renewables, or for scheduling shiftable loads in order to have the lowest CO2 emissions. To solve this, we provide a method to construct the marginal emission profiles via the merit order and demonstrate the method by composing these for the case of the Netherlands. Using this method, we re-evaluate the CO2 impact in 2014 of photovoltaic-generated electricity to be 0.42 Mt – compared to 0.36 Mt using the average emission factor - and for wind-generated electricity to be 3.6 Mt instead of 2.9 Mt CO2 (an increase of 14.3% and 24.2%, respectively). Furthermore, we show the impact of CO2 price on the merit order and show that even high CO2 prices of 50 to 75 €/tCO2 are not sufficient to phase-out new coal-fired power plants.

Paper Nr: 40
Title:

Smart Wind Turbine: Artificial Intelligence based Condition Monitoring System

Authors:

Afshin Tafazzoli and Alvaro N. Mayo

Abstract: This project is motivated by the importance of wind energy and reducing the financial and operational impact of faults in wind turbine generator using artificial intelligence based condition monitoring system. It is to classify the fault alarms and diagnose smart solutions at level zero to resolve the faults without service expert’s intervention. Big data analysis of the large historical data pool results in the intelligent algorithms that can power the diagnostic models. For maximum efficiency, wind turbines tend to be located in remote locations such as on offshore platforms. However, this remoteness leads to high maintenance costs and high downtime when faults occur. These factors highlight the importance of early fault detection and fast resolution in great extent. The aim of the project has been to have smart wind turbines integrated with artificial intelligence. The condition monitoring system should have the capability to detect, identify, and locate a fault in a wind turbine and remotely reset the turbines whenever possible.